The Power of Citizen Media


Sorry for the back-to-back political posts. I try to keep politics to a minimum on this blog, but as the election heats up I find myself with more and more to say on the matter.

Over the weekend, a blogger asked Palin a hard question and got an evasive answer. The result was a widely circulated blog post detailing how Palin and McCain refused to answer the questions put to them.

Recently a blogger in Utah had a run in with Utah Senate Majority Leader Curt Bramble and posted the encounter on her blog. I think she was surprised by the play it got and the reaction, but she writes well in a hip, snarky way and the story took off.

While some believe the media no longer asks the hard questions because it doesn't lead to good ratings, the truth is we've never been more empowered as citizens to affect campaigns, elections, and government operations. The voice that new media gives ordinary people is unprecedented and will have a noticeable affect on the election.

That puts more pressure on everyone to employ good filters and decide for themselves what matters and what doesn't. While this new media gives ordinary citizens a real voice, it can also be used to swiftboating a candidate with lies and half truths as long as they make for a compelling story. A good example is the deplorable bevy of chain letters going around the Internet about Obama's alleged radical Muslim connections.

Update: The pizza delivery girl, Anna Eagar, is now campaigning for Bramble's opponent.