Posts with keyword: drm


Reactivating Vista in Parallels 4.0

Windows Vista (oops, can I still call it that?) has "Windows Genuine Advantage" and so when it's moved to new hardware have having been installed somewhere else, it needs to be "reactivated." Parallels Desktop was recently updated to version 4.0. This apparently involved some changes to the virtualized hardware presented to the OS since machines created with older versions of Parallels have to be upgraded. You can see where this is going. The conversion process "fails" with a message that something has to be done manually. When you get into the machine, Vista is asking to
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Moviecle: Download Movies to Your USB Thumbdrive

I was in Boston's Logan airport this afternoon getting ready to fly home when I say this kiosk called a "Moviecle." The short description is it's a kiosk where you download movies to a USB thumbdrive. They have a collection of free content--travel guides--for now and hope to sell movies in the future. The London travel guides I downloaded were from TravelOn, in WMV format, and had no DRM. I don't know whether that will be the case for movies or not. Somehow I suspect not. The touch screen interface was easy to use. If I were buying, I'd
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Achieving Accountability

Dave Winer's Club140.org gives us a good example of how hard it is to protect data. For those of you not following along at home, Dave created a site, called Club140, that lists any tweets he sees on Twitter that are exactly 140 characters long (the max allowed by Twitter). Today, Dave posted this on Twitter: i just added code to http://club140.org/ to filter out messages from people posting from "protected" accounts. hadn't thought of it before. The issue is that some people have their tweets protected so that only people who are following them can see what they
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HD-DVD Processing Keys Getting Some Late Play

A few months ago, I wrote a post on HD Processing Keys and the futility of DRM. I pointed to an article on Engadget that talked about the AACS processing keys being retrieved. As a quick aside, the processing keys are a little like the master keys that allow hundreds or thousands of discs created before April 23rd to be ripped. Yesterday, the story exploded when someone posted the keys, it got lots of action on Digg, and then Digg pulled the story in response to a complaint from the AACS. My post happens to be the first hit
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Blu-ray and HD DVD Processing Key Exposed

According to Engadget, a DRM hacker named "arnezami" has found the "processing key" that can decrypt all HD DVD and Blu-ray Disc films. This is huge. Previously, there were ways of recovering the keys that controlled the individual disc, but you had to have a different key for each title. Now, one tool, with this key embedded in it, will be able to decrypt every disc that's been produced to date. This kind of thing just shows the futility of DRM as a solution for protecting copyrighted works. At 20Gb per movie and $25 for a blank disc, there's
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DRM Costs

A c|net test shows that DRM is computationally expensive and results in a measurable drain on battery life. For Microsoft's WMA 10 DRM on a Creative Zen Vision:M, DRM resulted in 25% less battery life. The iPod and Fairplay only accounted for 8%. Whether it's 8% or 25%, the shortened play time is a feature cost that puts the burden square on the user. You pay for the music and then you get less functionality than you would with uncrippled tracks. Ugh!
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CRAP: At the Whiteboard

David Berlind has a 3 minute whiteboard presentation on CRAP (content restiction, annulment, and protection), the new term for DRM. His advice: don't buy anything with CRAP in it. I like these little whiteboard presentations. They're a lot like screencasts, short, simple to make, and easy to watch. As long as we're on the subject of CRAP, check out the analyses of iTunes U, Apples attempt to corral universities into the iTunes/iPod silo, by Jon Udell and Gardner Campbell. Jon got a load of crap (note the small case) from Mac zealots for daring to criticize Apple.
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DRM, TiVo, and the iPod

I put a little piece at Between the Lines on TiVo's announcement that they future versions of TiVoToGo will have support for creating iPod ready video. While you're there, check out David Berlind's article on Sony and DRM. Apparently Sony is rethinking DRM as a strategy. In related news, the rootkit and other CD DRM techniques can be defeated by scotch tape. Cool.
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DRM Day

Today was DRM Day at Between the Lines. David Berlind posted three excellent stories that all had something to do with DRM: The DRM grinch who stole Christmas The day the broadcast died How to stop Hollywood and Congress from trampling on your constitutional rights In addition, I posted a personal story about DRM that claims that the DMCA (yes, I got it wrong at BTL and wrote DCMA) is more about protecting TiVo's (and other company's) business model than it is about protecting the rights of copyright holders. I was especially intrigued by the post on broadcast. What
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IIW2005: Identity Rights Agreements

This afternoon there was a good sized group that got together to discuss Identity Rights Agreements. One big problem is the legal status of such agreements. Mary Rundle was very helpful to the discussion here. One point was that an organization (like Identity Commons) could create a "trustmark" that Web sites that take identity data could display saying they agree to abidee by IRAs. This provides some prtection under trademark law, but may not be the best way really punish violaters. Data protection privacy commissioners want to create a regime for protecting personly identifying information. What we're saying in
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Identity and Presence

I put a piece about the difference between identity and presence information at Between the Lines. The difference is pinpointed by iTunes in its use of proxies for presence to enforce its DRM policies--badly, as it turns out.
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