Posts with keyword: etech


Slideshows on IT Conversations!

Yesterday I posted Jane McGonigal's talk from ETech 2007 on creating alternate realities. This is the first show on IT Conversations that features our new slideshow tool for playing audio sync'd with the slides. For some talks this can make a real difference in the quality since they rely on the visuals so much. In the past we've sometimes not published good content because it relied too much on the slides. No more! Check it out and let us know what you think.
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CouchDB from 10,000 Feet

Jan Lehnardt and Damien Katz(click to enlarge) Damien Katz and Jan Lehnardt are talking about CouchDB. My students have mentioned it several times and we've had brief discussions about it, but I've never spent much time on it. This seemed like my chance. CouchDB's goal is a simple, non-relational database. Damien started the CouchDB project after working for a number of years on the Lotus Notes project. He loved the document model of the data store (as did a lot of other people). He wanted an open source version of that model and CouchDB was born. In real life,
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Larry Lessig on Changing Congress

Larry Lessig on Changing Congress(click to enlarge) Lessig's keynotes are hard to blog, but the message isn't. Lessig's basic message is that government makes poor policy--even when the choice ought to be easy. The problem isn't overt bribery. In fact, we may have the best situation we've ever had in that sense. But even good people are affected by indirect dependence on money. Money in politics causes problems in three ways Divert access - congressmen pay attention to donors over others. Change reasoning - Sets up an perverse incentive where regulation creates money raising opportunities This has created a
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Kicking Ass

Kathy Sierra talks about kicking ass(click to enlarge) Kathy Sierra takes the stage again at ETech to talk about kicking ass. She says that people aren't passionate about things they suck at. Finding passion is a way to kick ass. She talks about neurogenesis, the idea that the brain can change positively. It's more plastic than we ever thought. She recommends an article by Jonah Lehrer in Seed Magazine on the work of Professor Elizabeth Gould. Stimulating environments matter--cages (or cubes) aren't stimulating environments. The common thread of people who perform at a world class level is that they
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John McCarthy on the Elephant Programming Language

John McCarthy(click to enlarge) He wasn't on the program, but this morning's keynote was given by Professor John McCarthy--the inventor of LISP and coiner of the term "artificial intelligence." This morning, he's talking about Elephant 2000, a programming language designed for writing programs that interact with people. One of the things he points out that I find interesting is the idea that the compiler should generate required data structures without the user having to specify them. I'm not sure how that works from his explanation, but I'm certain that if we want languages that admit more parallelism, this is
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DIY Drones: Building Cheap UAVs

Chris Anderson(click to enlarge) One of the reasons I love ETech is talks like this one from Chris Anderson (of Wired) on building homebrew drones, or unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs). He has a Web site that shows how to build the various kinds of drones he talked about. He's used Lego Mindstorms, cell phones, and microcontrollers on planes. The results are pretty astounding. Jordi with the blimp(click to enlarge) He wanted something you could do indoors, and hit on the idea of using blimps--which are inherently autonomous since they float. The blimp uses ultrasonic sensors to maintain altitude. When
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Amazon's SimpleDB

Jay Ridgeway from Nextumi(click to enlarge) This afternoon, I was torn between the session on botnets and one on Amazon's SimpleDB by Mike Culver and Jay Ridgeway. I chose the latter. The goal is a durable, flexible datastore at a cheap price: $0.14 per machine house, $0.10/Gb into the cloud and $0.18/Gb out. The API call list is short. Domains are used to partition data. You can think of them as tables, that helps. To add something to a domain you use this syntax: PUT (item, 123), (description, Sweater), (color, Red), (color, Blue) The first name-value tuple is the
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Sectored Wi-Fi Architecture

Xirrus Wi-Fi array controller(click to enlarge) O'Reilly is using one of these Xirrus Wi-Fi arrays and so far, I've got to say I'm impressed. The bandwidth has been great with none of the traditional conference wi-fi problems we all have learned to live with The picture is of the operational array on the light truss in front of the stage. Looks much cooler in real life since all the lights are blinking! According to the Web site, the XS16, which is what we've got here, can deliver up to 864Mbps of bandwidth. Very cool.
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Your Carbon Footprint

Saul Griffith(click to enlarge) This morning's opening keynote at ETech was Saul Griffith who ran down the steps he used to calculate his own carbon footprint and then what he had to do to put himself on a "carbon diet." It's not pretty. Doing the calculation is relatively straightforward in terms of the math, but gathering the data isn't easy. I'm hoping that we can get his slides when we put the audio up on IT Conversations because there's some great data there. Speaking of IT Conversations, a recent IEEE show has a section on home co-generation. You can
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Kathy Sierra: Storyboarding for Non-Fiction

Kathy Sierra talks about storyboarding(click to enlarge) How do you create riveting technical presentations and user manuals? Tell a story. Kathy Sierra is teaching the tutorial and using her own experience creating the "Head First" books on Java and Design Patterns as examples. Define your "post-click" behavior. After someone has gotten your message, what would happen in the reader? Does you message change the readers behavior? Do you know how you want it to change them? You can't create the right material without understanding what you want to achieve. In the case of What creates a page turner? Suspense,
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Hacking Organizations: Chad Dickerson

Chad Dickerson, who I've known since he was the CTO at InfoWorld, and runs the Yahoo! Developer Network, is giving a talk about how to hack an organization. When Chad put together the Yahoo! Hack day, he had to hack everything from the way brand managers thought about brand to talking the groundskeepers into letting people camp on the lawn and turning off the sprinkler system.
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The Core of Fun: Raph Koster

Raph Koster introduces himself as an alien from another planet: a game designer. He's the author of The Theory of Fun. He starts by introducing structure in music and art with some cool audience participation. There are different dimensions to fun: Hard Easy Visceral Social Hard fun is about solving problems. The problems tend to be mathematical Therefore the grammar of hard games ignore presentation. He applies the theory of fun to Amazon.com and concludes that it's not structural, not fun. There a lots of sequential steps and don't provide any "fun" or feedback. The magic ingredients: Territory -
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Is This an Apple Conference?

This is a big hotel. There are several other conferences going on at the same time as ETech. I was in the gift shop during the break. A guy with a badge from one of the other conferences saw me standing in line, MacBook in hand, and asked me "Is that an Apple conference or something? Everyone there is using an Apple!"
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Learning from Muggles

Danah Boyd is talking about learning from muggles. If we consider the technologists to be the wizards, that makes the normal user a muggle. There's a real danger in designing for ourselves. Danah describes four stages people go through in their lives: Identity formation and role-seeking - young people are trying to make sense of the societal roles around them. We are defined, in large part, by the people around us. Friendship and interaction become important. Integration and coupling - This period is trying to find meaningful labor and determine how they can contribute. A lot of twenty-somethings are
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The Coming Age of Magic: Ubiquitous Computing User Experiences

Mike Kuniavsky(click to enlarge) Mike Kuniavsky, the founder of Adaptive Path, has a company called Thing M, a device design studio that "Lives at the intersections of ubiquitous computing, ambient intelligence, industrial design and materials science." He's giving a talk on The Coming Age of Magic. The idea is that Moore's Law has pushed the price of computing so low that it is nearly disposable. Computing can be everywhere. People have talked about ubiquitous computing for a long time, but the era of cheap, low-power computing, and wireless communication has arrived. We no longer need to serve as the
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IT Conversations Meetup

I just got back from the IT Conversations meetup here at ETech. I really enjoyed meeting people, talking about what they like and don't like, and hearing how they use IT Conversations. There were about a dozen people there. Doug Kaye was able to come and I think people enjoyed quizzing him about the beginnings of IT Conversations and giving him feedback on some of the technical aspects of how things work. Thanks to everyone who came! If you weren't able to be in San Diego for this meetup, we plan on having more in other parts of the
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Advanced Analytics in the Anonymized Data Space: Jeff Jonas

Jeff Jonas gave a great keynote this morning. (Here's a paper from IEEE Security and Privacy that explains some of this.) This afternoon he's adding context. Literally. Contexts allow seemingly unrelated records to become related. The idea is that two records get created in two different data stores, because of some common event, but the common event is unobservable to the organization and the perceptions around that event are not connected. When the organization queries these data sources to make a decision, the fact that these records are related might not be known. He calls this enterprise amnesia. The
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ETech 2007 Photos

I've posted some pictures from the Emerging Technology (ETech) conference on my gallery site.
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Hierarchical Temporal Memories

Jeff Hawkins of Numenta (and also founder of Palm and Handspring) talked about brains and computers. He discussed hierarchical temporal memory in detail. There's a platform you can download and play with. I was busy listening and didn't get good notes.
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Creating Alternate Realities: Jane McGonigal

Jane McGonigal(click to enlarge) Jane McGonigal is a "happiness hacker." Or at least that's how I'd summarize what she said. She does this by designing alternate reality games. Alternate realities do away with limitation in an effort to explore possible alternatives to current situations. (Slide to be here by Friday.) Jane gives a "forecast from the future" of things she thinks will be important for technology and tech companies. Here are the things she mentions Quality of life is the primary metric for evaluating everyday technology Positive psychology is a principle influence for design The public expects tech companies
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AWS and Your Data Center: ETech 2007

Werner Vogels, Amazon's CTO, is talking about their Web services--specifically the outsourced data center products (S3, EC2, and SQS) that I've written about before and that were the subject of an IT Conversations interview I did with Doug Kaye and Jeff Barr. Werner begins by making a case that (a) scaling is critical to Web businesses and (b) scaling, economically, is really hard. I was just twittering with Phil Burns last night about servers. He just took delivery of four for TagJungle. He's got a lot of work ahead of him setting them up. When TagJungle grows again, Phil
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Kathy Sierra

Update: Read about Kathy Sierra, Chris Locke, and Due Process. Kathy Sierra, who's blog I've come to enjoy very much, canceled her tutorial yesterday and session this morning because of death threats (warning--this link goes to graphic material) she's received on her blog and on other blogs. This saddens me deeply and makes me angry. I'm sad and angry that someone--anyone--has to endure this kind of fear in their life. What's more, I'm sad that these actions have silenced someone who has so much to offer to the world. It's unacceptable. It's hateful. It's simply wrong.
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Secrets of Mental Math: Arthur Benjamin

The closing keynote for Monday night, usually something fun and light, did not disappoint. The speaker was Arthur Benjamin, author of the book Secrets of Mental Math. He's a "mathemagician" doing mental math at lightening speed. He did magic squares, 4 digit number multiplication, day of the week calculations, and other things. It was very fun and entertaining.
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IT Conversations Meetup Tuesday

Don't forget that we're having an IT Conversations Meetup tomorrow night at 7:30pm. The session in the Gregory A room of the Manchester Grand Hyatt. Doug Kaye's in town and will be joining us. Come and give us feedback, ask questions, and talk about anything at all. I hope you can make it.
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O'Reilly Radar: ETech 2007

Technology, hackers, Gibson, alpha-something-or-other, future, etc., etc., etc. You've heard the O'Reilly schtick before. Tim knows you've heard it before, so he skipped it and give as a new quote from Dale Doherty: "You guys aren't pulling your weight around here. You're not having enough fun!" Make Magazine is fun. People are doing what they do for the sheer joy of it. Snowboarding wasn't started as a business, rather for fun. Linus Torvald didn't start Linux for a business--he started it for fun. Finally, the Gibson quote. Tim talks about his future son-in-law putting a design for a new
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Applied Web Heresies: ETech 2007

I really wanted to go to Putting the Fun in Functional: Applying Game Mechanics to Social Software by Amy Jo Kim, but my inner geek won out and I went to Applied Web Heresies with Avi Bryant (slides). I hope someone else took good notes. The basis for the talk is Seaside, a web framework for Smalltalk that Avi wrote several years ago. The problem with Seaside is you're not going to use it! There are a lot of interesting ideas in Seaside that people should know, so this tutorial is way of spreading the ideas outside of Smalltalk.
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ETech 2006 Photos

Dave Sifry(click to enlarge) I finally was able to unload my camera and post my pictures from ETech. Enjoy. On a related note, I recently discovered that something I'm doing in my template for Gallery is making it so that photos don't show up in Safari. I'll have to look at that.
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Mark Hurst on Email Productivity (ETech 2006)

Mark Hurst, the creator of GoodExperience.com and ThisIsBroken is speaking on Bit Literacy: A Strategy for Productivity in Your Bit-Drenched Life. Here's what bit literacy means. Mark goes specifically to email to bring the conversation down to nuts and bolts. Mark recommends a rule of getting your inbox count to zero at least once every business day. Here's the method: Find the very most important email in the inbox. Mark believes these are personal emails from family and friends. Spend time reading them and processing them (reply, print, file) and then delete them. Go to the least important messages
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reBlog (ETech 2006)

Michael Frumin and Michal Migurski, the development team behind reBlog are showing it off. At first glance, reBlog looks like an online feedreader (with a nice interface). The difference is that reBlog is aimed at using the information in feeds rather than just reading it. You can easily republish information, archive it, tag it, add comments, and so on. In addition, a plugin architecture let's programmers and developers add new features to the RSS processing chain and customize it to specific uses. For example, you could subscribe to a feed that contains items from eBay and then use the
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Alex Russell on Comet: Beyond AJAX (ETech 2006)

Alex Russell, who works at JotSpot and did the DOJO Toolkit for JavaScript is talking about Comet and low latency data to and from browsers (slides). The subtitle is "after AJAX." The goal is responsiveness. AJAX gives you half the answer. AJAX is about me. Social applications are driven by others--the multiuser web. How do we send the datagrams that users make to each other. To any one user, the server represents the other users. Because the Web is a multiuser experience, single interaction updates aren't enough. Users in the same "space" need live updates of their own changes
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Mary Hodder on iTags (ETech 2006)

Mary Hodder is talking about itags. An itag is a tag + author identity + CC license + media object. Media objects can be text, photo, video, or audio. Trusing tags means trusting the maker of the tag. By uniquely identityfy the object, the tag, the author, and the licensing; the itag can live anywhere. The goal of all this is to put tags and objects together so that they can be included in places like feeds. "I-tagging would remove the requirement for a tag to be coupled with the originating URL (blog post URL) because identity would be
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Christopher Payne on Windows Live (ETech 2006)

Christopher Payne from Microsoft is giving a demo of Microsoft's new live.com services. He's standing on stage in a suit. The visual discontinuity of that is jarring. His assistant, Frederick, is adding new widgets to a page, very AJAXy. The visuals are pretty slick. Live search let's you search within the results. There's a smart scroll bar that dynamically grabs information as needed so that you don't have to click "next" and "prev" to get other results. Image search has been completely rebuilt. Nice slider bars allow you to reduce or expand the size of thumbnails in image search.
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George Dyson on Turing's Cathederal (ETech 2005)

Ester Dyson introduces her brother George. She says that his job as a historian is to determine what is worthy of our attention. George talks about the "prophets" of the computer age. People who saw things long before their time. George recounts some of the early 20th century thinking about artificial intelligence. In contrast to some of these earlier ideas are ideas about collective intelligence. Alfred Smee defined ideas about bit-mapping and search engines in the mid 19th century. Thomas Hobbes, in 1651 posited automata and the question of whether they have a life of their own (in addition
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Michael Goldhaber on the Real Nature of the Attention Economy (ETech 2006)

Michael Goldhaber is speaking on the real nature of the attention economy. Michael's been working on a book about attention on this subject since the 1990's. He thinks that this conference has its feet in two paradigms: the attention economy and the old economy. "You all don't know what world you're in. You're like butterflies that think your caterpillars." Attention is a different way of being. Michael sees attention as a new level in the massively multiplayer game known as western culture. The economy is a single level game, but economic history is a multilevel game. The first level
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Hans Peter Brondmo on Plum (ETech 2006)

Hans Peter Brondmo is speaking on "First You Google, But Then What?" When you have a question, you direct it to the great oracle: the search engines. The problem is that you can't make those results personal, collect them, rearrange them, and share them. Plum is a system for building collections of things that you find on the 'Net and share them. You can also collect from applications on your machine, including email, photos, music, etc. Has Peter demos how the tool (called a plummer) can automatically build a playlist of songs you're listening to. Plum also creates a
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Joel Spolsky's Report Card (ETech 2006)

Joel Spolsky is speaking on creating blue-chip products. His formula: Make people happy (control) Think about emotions Obsess over aesthetics AJAX is an example of something that can make people happy by giving them instantaneous feedback. He points to the Ambercrombie Web site as an example. He gave the example of cars for emotion and the iPod for aesthetics. How are people living up to the formula? He brings up reddit. It uses AJAX, has a cute alien as a mascot (large eyes and bald--looks like a human baby). The alien creates cartoon stories that create an emotional bond.
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Brian Dear on Eventful and EVDB (ETech 2006)

Brian Dear from EVDB and Eventful is speaking on calendar as platform. His talk is title "When Do We Get the Events We Want?" He gives a quick overview of the company. EVDB stands for the Events and Venues Database. The goal is to maximize event discovery. The Web has done a pretty bad job of getting people to the events they're interested in. Making data for events open and portable is important, so is having the right tools to manage that data. The company has a platform called EVDB and a portal called Eventful. Anyone can use EVDB.
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Clay Shirky on Moderation Strategies (ETech 2006)

Clay Shirky is speaking about pattern languages for moderation strategies. A pattern is a combination of a goal and strategy combination that's detailed enough that you can see how to build it, but not so detailed that you can't repurpose it to a different domain. This has come into vogue in the object oriented world. Clay suggests a pattern strategy for moderating discussion. He shows a graph that has "freedom to create group communications" vs. "Annoyingness". The problem is there's a steep knee in the curve, meaning that there's a point where as soon as you get a certain
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Jon Udell on Seeking Attention (ETech 2006)

Jon Udell is the morning's opening keynote. We are all seekers of attention. We all have ideas we'd like to promote and agendas we'd like to publicize. So, we all make claims on other people's attention. The focus of his talk is how to reward those who give us attention. Jon sees for patterns. First patterns is what Jon calls "Heads, Decks, and Leads." An idea from the world of "dead trees" these give users information about context switches because they're hard and time consuming. Writing good titles, naming things, is hard because there's a cognitive dissonance in trying
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Microformats (ETech 2006)

Tantek Celik or Technorati and crew are doing a microformats talk. He says that microformats are more than just good class names. There are principles that keep things "micro," process that emphasized getting real, and community that minimizes duplicates. Here's the process: Pick a specific, simple problem and define it Research and document current web publishing behavior document existing formats in the problem area brainstorm with implied schema and reuse names iterate within the community Rohit Khare takes the mic to talk about work he's doing on microsearch for microformats. One is called miffy. I didn't get the name
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Tim Bray on Atom (ETech 2006)

Tim Bray is speaking on Atom as a case study. RSS is the most successful use of XML in existence. If it's that successful, why replace it? Tim outlines some problems with RSS as specified: The RSS specification says "one only", but many podcasts use multiple enclosures. Clients vary unpredictably in how they support them. There is silent data loss. In a title element doing AT&T or AT&amp;T or fails silently. The only predictable way to do it is AT&amp;amp;T and that just sucks. Links sometimes don't work. In an RSS <description>, putting a link to an image doesn't
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Derek Powazek on Community

Derek Powazek is talking about new communities on the Web. He says that the Web is less about companies createing "company" towns and more about people creating their own spaces. He uses the Technorati Top 100 bloggers as examples of people who have enormous reach and create their own community. Company town are communities, but they're extrememly authoritative. If you step out of line, you can find yourself out of the community. When you create your own community, that's no longer true. Derek mentions MeasureMap as an example of a site that helps manage community--showing visitors and posts. I've
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Heuristicrats (ETech 2006)

In a talk on the Hunch Engine at ETech, Eric Bonabeau used the term "heuristicrat" to describe professionals who use years of professional experience in a black box decision process to limit choice. His example was an architect who says "no" to almost every question the client asks in an effort to channel the client into a small set of designs the architect is comfortable with. Heuristocrats don't think outside the box, as it were.
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Linda Stone on Attention

Linda Stone, speaking on Attention as the Real Aphrodisiac asks the audience these questions: I always pay attention I pay partial attention The way I use technology improves my quality of life Technology compromises the way I live my life Technology sets me free Technology enslves me Continuous partial attention (CPA) is a phrase Linda coined to describe the way people live in the world of high-tech. It's an adaptive behavior. We're on our way toa dapting beyond it. CPA has been a way of life for many. It's a post multi-tasking approach. In multi-tasking, we give the same
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Sifry on the Attention Economy

Dave Sifry of Technorati is speaking on The Economy of Attention. What are the rules that guide the attention economy and how are they different than the rules we're used to in the real economy. Attention is about time directed to a purpose by people. Most economic models focus on what is scarce in the system. Economic systems aren't only defined by what is scarce, but it's a pretty good tool to find the seams in the fabric of the economy. In the attention economy, computing power, storage, network bandwidth, and even money aren't scarce. Time is what even
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Cory Ondrejka on Web 3.0

Cory Ondrejka from Second Life is speaking about what he things is one of the most interesting aspects of Second Life: the departure from the usual pain vs. participation graph. Even though making things in Second Life isn't easy, there's an unusually high participation rate. People who use spaces like Second Life tend to look at them as real space. These are garnering a lot of the attention that people spend. The economic scale of Second Life is impressive: over the last 30 days, 240,000 distinct items were bought an sold. The conventional wisdom is that user created content
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Multitouch Interaction (ETech 2006)

Jeff Han, from NYU's Computer Science department is giving a demo of something called Multitouch, a new computer interface. he has a rear projection graphing table with a multitouch sensor, something not normal on a touch screen. You can do chording, for example. He shows a fluid simulation (lava lamp) that responds to multiple touch. You can easily see how you can do things to the interface that you can't do with a single point of touch (like a mouse). He demos a photographers light box application. Picking up pictures, rotating them, etc. is exactly the same as doing
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Seth Goldstien: Attention Broker (ETech 2006)

Seth Goldstein is talking about Root Markets: Applications for the New Attention Economy. Root is an attention exchange. Is attention about money or time? Seth jokes that he's from New York and so he focuses on the money aspect of attention, leaving the time aspect to folks from San Francisco. Is attention a privacy challenge or publicity opportunity. Sharing your attention (ala last.fm, for example). The best guarantee for attention is living your life as open as possible, as public as possible. Receiving attention makes you influential. This can occur even when you're not there (even dead). Web services
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Dick Hardt on Identity 2.0 (ETech 2006)

Dick Hardt's company has a big sponsorship presence at ETech, the badge lanyards and even the room keys bear the SXIP badge. This morning he's doing the sequel to his Identity 2.0 talk, made famous by his style and humor. This morning's talks is titled "Who's the Dick on My Site?" How do I prove I am who I say I am? How do Web sites know the things I want them to know without them to know with minimal disclosure? The content was new, but the message was very much the same, but the presentation is more tutorial
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Bruce Sterling on the Internet of Things (ETech 2006)

The evening keynote (last night) was by Bruce Sterling on the Internet of Things. This was one of those talks that is impossible to blog. Even a word-for-word transcript wouldn't do it justice because Bruce's delivery is as much a part of the content as what he says. I'm sure it will be on IT Conversations soon and I encourage you to listen to it there. Bruce's message was about language and the power of naming. He said, that when it comes to remote technology, you don't want to freeze your language too early. It limits the ability of
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Ray Ozzie's Clipboard for the Web (ETech 2006)

Ray Ozzie is the first keynote of the first day. He's talking about building composite applications (what he's calling mashups) on the Web. The real power is bringing composite apps to the user level. A reference to shell commands and pipes in UNIX bring a good image to mind for anyone who's done that. GUIs bring big apps that user weave together using the clipboard to accomplish work. The Web has a lot of standalone apps. Where is the clipboard for the Web? Ray launches into a demo of "live clipboard." This simulates a button control inside the browser
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Opening Session (ETech 2006)

Tim O'Reilly is giving his traditional "O'Reilly Radar" talk. Alternately titles: Following the Alpha Geeks. What to pay attention to: Technology on track with long term trend Technology is disruptive Technology uptake is accelerating Technology is grassroots--bottom up It inspires passion It has deeper social implications Better information makes a difference in it's adoption and use There's also a pattern recognition component to this. The leading Linux applications turned out to be server-side Web applications like Google. Information business are using the Internet as a platform to deliver software as a service harnessing collective intelligence. The key competitive advantage
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Rails and Ajax for Page Application Development (ETech 2006 Tutorial)

I'm in David Heinemeier Hansson's tutorial on Beneath-the-Page Application Development with Rails. His Rails tutorial from last summer remains one of my most viewed blog entries. He starts out noting that AJAX is the most important innovation for the Web in years. But JavaScripting the DOM still sucks...a lot. JavaScripting the DOM is incompatible with how regular programmers think about programming. Part of the problem is the sorry state of browser. One line of change can lead to hours of regressions because of browser incompatibilities. Then there's the browser underworld (all the old, out of date browsers that are
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Introduction to JavaScript (ETech 2006 Tutorial)

This morning I'm in the A (Re-)Introduction to JavaScript tutorial taught be Simon Willison. Simon recommends Javascript: The Definative Guide by David Flanagan as one of the few Javascript references that's worthwhile. He hasn't found a good reference on the Web. Brendan Eich invented JavaScript in 1995. The ECMA standard went through only 3 revisions with the last one in 1998. Good news: the language is stable. Bad news: there's lots of codified warts. Javascript avoids I/O, so it's not quite a general purpose language: it has to be embedded in a host environment that supplies this. In the
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ETech Tutorials

I'm at ETech, just waiting for the the first tutorial to begin. I'm signed up for two today. This morning I'm going to A (Re-)Introduction to JavaScript taught be Simon Willison. This afternoon, I'm going to Beneath-the-Page Application Development with Rails with David Heinemeier Hansson. His Rails tutorial from last summer remains one of my most viewed blog entries. I'll post notes, so follow along.
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Lessons Learned Building Basecamp

San Diego (click to enlarge) I wrote about Basecamp a few days ago. Jason Fried, president of 37Signal, the company behind Basecamp is talking about the lessons he learned building it. Brian would like to get Jason out to Utah to give one of these. The right people. Its not about their skills beyond the basics. It's about finding people who are positive, well rounded, quick learners, trustworthy, and good writers. Well rounded, in this context means that they aren't just an architect, or a DBA. "I'll take someone who is happy and average over a guru who is
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