Posts with keyword: social+media


Social Media as Enterprise Exception Handling

Kaliya sent me notes by David Terrar from talks by JP and John Hagel from the Dachis Business Summit. Good stuff. Here's a quote from Hagel that caught my eye on social media and exception handling: Where can I maximise impact from this deployment? He suggested the richest area is around exception handling, which he called the shadow economy of the enterprise. He suggested 60-70% of knowledge workers is devoted to exception handling, and this is the ideal place to use social tools to find the right people and connect to the data. From Dachis Business Summit - you
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Using Social Media Badly: Novatel as a Case Study

Image by Old Shoe Woman via Flickr I'm a pretty happy MiFi owner, but I've had a problem with my battery and would like to buy a new one. They're not easy to find, so I was plesantly surprised to find that Novatel (the maker of the MiFi) had a Twitter account: @MyLifeMyWayMiFi. I followed and when I saw some activity, replied to @MyLifeMyWayMiFi asking where spare batteries could be purchased. Nothing. I tried a few more time when I saw activity and have never received any kind of reply. It's clear that Novatel is using it's Twitter account
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Monkey Pornography, Social Status, and Reputation

Britt is further developing his thoughts on relative celebrity. He points to a study that looks at social status in monkeys and their willingness to sacrifice food to look at the faces of high-status individuals and what amounts to monkey pornography. On the flip side, they demand more food to look at the faces of low-status individuals. Male rhesus macaques sacrificed fluid for the opportunity to view female perinea and the faces of high-status monkeys but required fluid overpayment to view the faces of low-status monkeys. Social value was highly consistent across subjects, independent of particular images displayed, and
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Relative Celebrity and Reputation

Britt's working on a concept he calls Relative Celebrity. The idea is that in the world of the long tail, there is some ranking and "every member of a network must be related to someone who is closer to the action - relatively speaking, a celebrity - and also act as a valued conduit of news, gossip and conjecture for others, acting as that person's relative celebrity." It's an intriguing idea and one that makes me think about reputation and it's value in a global Internet sense. To date, online reputation systems have been localized to a particular Web
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