Posts with keyword: technometria


Putting IT Conversations to Bed

After 3300 shows, the time has come for IT Conversations to end. While I'll miss it, I'm proud of what we've accomplished and will be grateful for the friendships I've made and skills I've developed.
Continue reading...


Is SOA Dead?

Image by crazbabe21 via Flickr At the first of the year, Anne Thomas Manes wrote a provocative blog entry stating that SOA is dead. This week's Technometria podcast is a discussion with Anne about her thesis and what it means for practitioners and technologists. I think you'll enjoy it whether you're a fan of SOA or not. From the description at IT Conversations: Service-Oriented Architecture (SOA) provides ways to group functions around business processes, packaging them as services. This allows for better coordination between services. Anne Thomas Manes of the Burton Group joins Phil and Scott to discuss whether
Continue reading...


This Week on Technometria: Aaron Iba on EtherPad

This week Scott and I speak with Aaron Iba about EtherPad and the AppJet platform that it's built on. There are plenty of interesting problems involved in creating a real-time collaborative editing environment with Javascript in the browser. I loved the discussion and got a few ideas about designing collaborative services. Related articles by ZemantaEtherPad: Collab your script (ajaxian.com)EtherPad: Real-time Editing with JavaScript (ejohn.org)Etherpad Shows Google Docs How It's Done (techcrunch.com)EtherPad: Dead Simple Real Time Collaboration (readwriteweb.com)
Continue reading...


Technometria Podcast: A New Year and New Projects

In this week's Technometria podcast, we talk about the new year and some new projects. With the beginning of a new year, it's always a good time to look ahead to upcoming activities and products. In this podcast Dion, Ben, Scott, and I talk about what we're are expecting in 2009. We also discuss the problems with having to raise funds for a business startup, a necessary but often difficult process. We also talk about some of the new products announced at CES and Macworld. Scott also talks about his download of the Windows 7 Beta. The discussion ends
Continue reading...


Innovation and the Secret Sauce

In this week's Technometria podcast, Craig Burton joined Scott and I to discuss some of his ideas about innovation. Craig reviews topics covered in three of his recent essays and talks about how innovation is often misunderstood. He reviews how technology companies make mistakes with customer demographics, as well as how to distinguish innovation myths from innovation realities. He also presents an example of true innovation as he describes how Novell created software infrastructure as a new software category. Here's links to the essays: Mythical Demographics Intentional Innovation Ruminations of a Software Man
Continue reading...


My Blog is Six Years Old

Last week, my blog passed it's six year anniversary. My inaugural post (besides what amounted to a "hello world" test post) was on asset management. I didn't post again until the 10th of June. Like many bloggers I got off to a slow start. But June 2002 was a good month with a number of posts that indicate what was on my mind then. People often ask me how to get their traffic up on their blog. Unfortunately, my experience was atypical. I started early and was one of the first CIOs to blog (I was the CIO for
Continue reading...


Tiny Planet Likes IT Conversations

Tommy Weir of Tiny Planet wrote a nice review of IT Conversations. In particular he enjoyed the interview with Billy Hoffman about AJAX security. He says: If I had to pick one tech podcast and discard the rest it would be the originator of the species, IT Conversations. This blend of different shows has a wide-ranging remit from biotechnology to web development. They have a number of presenters who interview innovators and leading technologists, and they also put out recorded presentations from top conferences, which can be especially valuable. They're all free and available via iTunes. I listen to
Continue reading...


Top Ten IT Conversations Shows for January 2008

Here are the top ten shows (ordered by number of downloads) on IT Conversations for January 2008. Billy Hoffman - Technometria: Ajax Security (No rating yet)More and more Web sites are being rewritten as Ajax applications and traditional desktop software is rapidly moving to the Web via Ajax. But, often, this transition is being made with reckless disregard for security. Ajax developers desperately need guidance on securing their applications. Billy Hoffman, co-author of Ajax Security, joins Phil and Scott to discuss the book. CTO Panel - Technometria (No rating yet)Phil regularly holds a meeting that he calls the CTO
Continue reading...


Virtualization Security Threats

Laurianne McLaughlin has an excellent article in CIO magazine about security threats in virtual machines and what you can do now to mitigate them. One that caught my eye was No. 4, "Understand the Value of an Embedded Hypervisor". The reason I was tuned into that was a conversation I had with Gregory Ness on a Technometria podcast where he went into some detail about the role of a hypervisor in VM security. As an aside, am I the only one who finds the interstitial page ads that IDG is placing in this online magazines completely annoying? I wouldn't
Continue reading...


Top Ten IT Conversations Shows for October 2007

Here are the top ten shows on IT Conversations (by download) for October 2007: Bruce Johnson - Technometria: Google Web Toolkit (Rating: 4.20)Recently, Google released from beta its Google Web Toolkit. Google Web Toolkit (GWT) is an open source Java software development framework that makes writing AJAX applications like Google Maps and Gmail easy for developers who don't speak browser quirks as a second language. Phil and Scott talk to Bruce Johnson, one if its co-creators. In addition to discussing its development, Bruce gives a number of examples of projects that took advantage of GWT. Robert Trivers - What
Continue reading...


Talking Research with Rick Rashid

This week's technometria podcast is a discussion with Rick Rashid. Not only is he the head of Microsoft Research, but he's also the guy who started it. Microsoft Research is dedicated to conducting both basic and applied research in computer science and software engineering. The company also collaborates openly with colleges and universities worldwide to broadly advance the field of computer science. We discuss both Microsoft Research, as well as the general status of technology research. Rick first talks about his background and what led him to become involved in the formation of Microsoft Research. He discusses the general
Continue reading...


Talking to Drew Major on Technometria

I just posted an interview Scott and I did with Drew Major, one of the founders of Novell and someone who's doing some very interesting things with video. Talking with Drew is really interesting because he has a long history in technology and isn't satisfied with how things are. He's willing to code to make things scale.
Continue reading...


IT Conversations on Facebook

Lately Facebook has been all the rage. We've taken note of that at IT Conversations and we've created some Facebook groups for your favorite shows. First, there's the IT Conversations group on Facebook. There's also one for my personal podcast, Technometria. And Jon Udell's Interviews with Innovators also has a Facebook group. I'm not sure how we'll be using these, but I'd encourage you to join these groups and help us make them into something that will be useful to all of us. Also, if you're an IT Conversations listener, feel free to add me as a friend as
Continue reading...


Scott Berkun: Myths of Innovation

This week on the Technometria Podcast Scott, Ben, and I talked to Scott Berkun, author of the book The Myths of Innovation. We had a great conversation and Scott sold a couple of books right on the phone: both Ben and Scott went to Amazon while we were talking and picked up a copy. If you feel like buying the book after listening to Scott speak, but sure to buy it through IT Conversations, so we get the referral fee.
Continue reading...


Social Networks, eGovernment, and the iPhone

This weeks' Technometria podcast is a little unusual. Due to a scheduling problem on my part, it started out with Scott and I discussing his recent explorations on Ning. At one point we start talking about how social networks might work in government. I happened to notice that Dave Fletcher, the Chief Technology Officer for Utah, was online and so I asked him if he could join us. He dialed in and we had a good conversations. Naturally, we also discussed the iPhone since it was just days after I'd gotten mine. Also, be sure to check out the
Continue reading...


Speaking With Simon Phipps

This week, I posted the Technometria podcast with Simon Phipps. Simon is the Chief Open Source Officer at Sun. I've followed Simon's blog for years. He's one of the people I look to when I want to understand the subtleties of happenings in the open source world. I enjoyed the discussion very much and hope you enjoy it too. Be sure to listen to the end for the discussion of Lego ice cube trays.
Continue reading...


Document Engineering

This week's Technometria podcast is a discussion with Bob Glushko of UC Berkeley's iSchool. Bob's book, Document Engineering is a look at the methods people should employ in designing the document that surround their business. Document, in Bob's view, is a very broad term, encompassing everything from books and papers to XML. If you last week's discussion with Dave Weinberger, then this week's podcast will nice complement to that.
Continue reading...


Everything is Miscellaneous

This week's Technometria podcast is an interview with Dave Weinberger, author of Everything Is Miscellaneous: The Power of the New Digital Disorder. I've known Dave for some years and find him to be a very interesting person to talk to. This interview was no exception. The idea of everything being miscellaneous at first conjures up images of chaos, but the key is to remember that this isn't an argument against classification, but a priori classification. The Internet enables and requires that we classify things when we want them, not before. You may want things alphabetically and I may want
Continue reading...


Java Desktop Developments

This week's show on the Technometria podcast is an interview with Chet Hasse. Chet works for Sun Microsystems in the Java Desktop group. We talk about upcoming features in the Java desktop and Sun's applet strategy. Chet's new book Filthy Rich Clients: Developing Animated and Graphical Effects for Desktop Java Applications will be out in August. I'm sure this will be a great book for anyone interested in developing Java clients. The best GUI people I know also have some genuine artistic abilities. If you check out Chet's blog you'll see he fits the bill.
Continue reading...


Phil Wolff on Technometria

I've known Phil Wolff for years. Not in any particular context, he was just a fellow blogger I'd talk to at conferences we both showed up at. I enjoyed what he wrote. Then a while back, I noticed that my friend Phil had put himself front and center of all things Skype with Skype Journal, a blog that provides news, opinion, and tips about Skype. I ran into Phil at Internet Identity Workshop, where he was proposing something he calls "OpenCallerID." I thought it was high time we talked to him about Skype and other things that are interesting
Continue reading...


John Newton, Open Source Convert

John Newton was one of the founders of Documentum and, as a result, one of the inventors of what we now call "content management." Whether you like that term, or not, the idea of specialized databases that keep track of things like documents, Web sites, photographs, and so on has had a huge impact on our world. Now John is the CTO of Alfresco, an open source company building open source tools for managing content. John wasn't always an open source advocate, but now believe it's the right model for creating enterprise software. Scott Lemon, Ben Galbraith, and I
Continue reading...


Mikko Hypponen on Emergent Virus Threats

F-Secure is one of the leading companies devoted to the study and prevention of computer viruses, spam, and other types of malware. Last week we were lucky enough to get Mikko Hypponen, the company's Director of Anti-Virus Research, to join Scott and I in a discussion of the current status of the virus problem. Mikko first reviews his background and how he became involved in the study and prevention of malware. He discusses some of his experiences with both worms and early viruses and reviews some of the problems trying to prevent spam. He talks about how spammers are
Continue reading...


Bruce Perens on Software Patents

Last week Scott and I talked to Bruce Perens for the Technometria podcast. Bruce happened to be in Utah (although we did the interview over the phone) because of Brainshare. He wasn't in town to attend, but to protest the recent agreement between Novell and Microsoft. We had a good discussion of software patents, why he thinks the Novell-Microsoft agreement is bad for open source, and the change to the GPL to combat the deal. You can read a summary and listen to our discussion on IT Conversations.
Continue reading...


Howard Moskowitz on Technometria Podcast

This week's Technometria Podcast is with Howard Moskowitz, an expert in the field of psychophysics, and author of the upcoming book Selling Blue Elephants. My introduction to Howard from watching this talk by Malcolm Gladwell at TED. That's Gladwell, you'll enjoy listening to Howard even more. He's just a very smart, nice man with a great vision and a great ability to tell stories. Give it a listen. I think you'll enjoy it very much. I know I did.
Continue reading...


Doc Searls and the Giant Zero

Last week, Scott Lemon and I had a very enjoyable conversations with Doc Searls about a concept he's calling The Giant Zero. The concept is simple. In Doc's words: The metaphor is a play on the meaning of both World of Ends (which I co-wrote with fellow Berkman fellow David Weinberger) and The Stupid Network, by Berkman alumnus David Isenberg. (David is also my given name, by the way. Coincidence?) The origin of the metaphor, however, is Craig Burton, who was the first to observe that an end-to-end architecture in which every point is essentially zero distance from every
Continue reading...


Behind the Scenes: Producing the Technometria Podcast

Paul Figgiani, the Executive Producer of the Podcast Academy Channel and the Senior Audio Engineer for IT Conversations wrote up a behind the scenes description of what we did to make this weeks Technometria podcast with Doug Kaye and Jeff Barr. As Paul points out, there are seven people directly involved: the five people on the call and Paul and Joel Tscherne, the Series Producer for Technometria working behind the scenes. This is a good description of what it takes to make a show. I'm lucky to have good support--Paul and Joel do their jobs well and it makes
Continue reading...


Why Software Sucks, the Podcast

I just published the podcast version of Why Software Sucks on IT Conversations. The interview is part of the Technometria series with David Platt, author of the book. Here's the description of the show: What is the most important thing to the average computer user? They want their machine to "just work". Why does Google know how to correctly translate a United Parcel Service tracking number, while the actual UPS website requires multiple entries just to get to the point where the tracking number can be entered? Programmer David Platt is the author of "Why Software Sucks...and What You
Continue reading...


Who Wants To Be a VC?

Over the holidays I published a reduced schedule on IT Conversations. But we start the new year off with a full slate of great shows. Today I put up the Technometria show featuring Bryce Roberts of O'Reilly AlphaTech Ventures. Talking with Bryce was fun. At one point I asked him how one becomes a venture capitalist, so if you've ever wondered, give it a listen.
Continue reading...


Managing Vendors Before They Manage You

On this week's Technometria Podcast, Scott Lemon, Matt Asay and myself are joined by Britt Blaser and Doc Searls. We have a great discussion about how Internet tools can be used to manage vendors instead of them managing us. Doc calls this "vendor resource management." Good name.
Continue reading...


Talking About Sun's Open Source Java

I posted the latest edition of the Technometria Podcast yesterday. We talk about voting technology in the wake of the election and the announcement that Java was going open source. Matt has some interesting perspectives on what the GPL license would do to Sun's bottom line and why GPL was a strategic move. It's interesting to note that Java wasn't open sourced--rather the name was. That is, Sun still retains copyright and trademark protection over the name and thus can control what is and what isn't Java. For now, they seem to be keeping pretty tight restrictions on the
Continue reading...