NPR Story on Internet Piracy Misses the Point


Summary

If Hollywood were willing to battle piracy in the courts, almost no one would have issue with them. The problem is that they want extra-legal means that skirt due process.

SOPA Resistance Day!

This story about the California "civil war" over Internet piracy misses the point of the battle. Tim O'Reilly is quoted heavily and so are film makers who decry the lost revenue because their property is being stolen. The story ends like this:

Southerner Gavin Polone thinks eventually, the northerners will start to see the situation differently as they see how much it costs to make high-quality content.

"They'll be the same as these media companies that they're rallying against right now. And they will also start to look at this very expensive property as property, and they're not going to want to have it stolen from them," Polone says.

But both sides continue to wage war using the weapons they know best, whether it's the courts or the Internet.

The last line is indicative of how far astray NPR went. If Hollywood were willing to battle piracy in the courts, almost no one would have issue with them. The problem is that they want extra-legal means that skirt due process. They're willing to break the Internet to protect their privacy. What's worse, they're willing to buy Congress to get what they want. I wish NPR would dig deeper than the cute "civil war" metaphor and understand the real issues.