Archive for Oct 2005


Video Podcasting Talks

I want to be able to easily take a Powerpoint or Keynote deck and an audio file (MP3), sync them and turn them into an MP4. Can I use iMovie to do this?
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How LCD Screens Work

The other day someone asked my how an LCD projector worked compared to an LCD screen on your laptop. Their general impression was that the laptop screen was like a bunch of LEDs, so how could you "project" that? I didn't really know. I knew that it was backlit and that's why you could project it, but had no idea how it worked. I asked Kelly Flanagan and he didn't really know either, but he sent me this really good tutorial showing how it works--interactive and everything. Apparently this is just one in a whole collection called Einstien's Legacy.
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Personal Democracy on Steve Uquhart

The Personal Democracy Forum has a story on Steve Urquhart's Senate campaign to unseat Orrin Hatch.
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Video iPod and Tivo

Friday I picked up a new iPod (60Gb, Black). I spent the weekend figuring out how to get video onto it from my Tivo, DVDs, etc. Here's what I've discovered, so far: As I posted the other day, it's easy to download programs from your Tivo to your desktop. What isn't easy, on a Mac, is converting the shows to MPEG2 from the wrapper that Tivo puts them in. As I said in the earlier post DirectShop Dump will do that on a PC. You have to install the Tivo Desktop Connection first. I happen to have Virtual PC
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TinyDisk: Lessons for Web Applications Builders

At the CTO Breakfast, someone also brought up TinyDisk, a complete, shared filesystem built on to of TinyURL. If you're not familiar with TinyURL, it's a URL mapping service that let's you create a small, easily emailed URL to replace a long complicated one. Nice service that I've used several times. TinyDisk is a demonstration by Acidus. TinyDisk shows that anything that stores anything on the Web can be used to store something else by encoding the something else into the Web-based storage system. In the case of TinyDisk, it's a Web-based file system that slices up a file,
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CTO Breakfast Report

I really enjoyed this morning's CTO breakfast a lot. At the suggestion of some attendees, I tried to moderate it a little and keep it more focused on new and interesting technology. Here are some of the things we talked about: Riya is a new photo sharing service that includes face recognition. You can identify people by selecting their face and typing in something (name, keyword, etc.) The service then will identify that same face using that keyword in any other photos you've uploaded. Very cool. There are some obvious privacy concerns... Right now, it's invitation only and I'd
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IIW2005: Day Two Wrap-Up

Today we ran the conference using something called "structured open space." Kaliya Hamlin was anxious that we use it as a way of creating discussion. I'll admit that I was somewhat skeptical, but it turned out very well. Here's how it worked: As people came in at 8:30 we put them at tables with 8-10 people and told them to introduce themselves. About every 20 minutes we made them switch tables and reintroduce themselves to the new crowd. All along the way they were supposed to tell people what questions they most wanted answered in the workshop today. At
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IIW2005: Identity Rights Agreements

This afternoon there was a good sized group that got together to discuss Identity Rights Agreements. One big problem is the legal status of such agreements. Mary Rundle was very helpful to the discussion here. One point was that an organization (like Identity Commons) could create a "trustmark" that Web sites that take identity data could display saying they agree to abidee by IRAs. This provides some prtection under trademark law, but may not be the best way really punish violaters. Data protection privacy commissioners want to create a regime for protecting personly identifying information. What we're saying in
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IIW2005: Attention Data as Identity

Attention data is the record of what you've read, what you're spending time on, and what you should be paying attention to. Two different groups are thinking about attention data in a general way: Attention.xml and Attention Trust. My impression is that Attention.xml is more about the technology needed to track yourself while Attention Trust is more "rights" to "data you own." We had a discussion this morning at IIW2005 about attention data and identity. It's clear that attention data is founded on identity, it's less clear that attention data is identity in the sense of "digital identity" as
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IIW2005: Summary at Between the Lines

I posted some thoughts and a summary of Day One at Between the Lines.
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IIW2005: Pictures

I've posted some pictures I took today at IIW2005 on my Gallery. There's also some at Flickr that are tagged with iiw2005. I tried to get every speaker, but missed a few--just got busy writing and forgot to take a picture. Sorry.
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IIW2005: Joel Getzendanner on Identity Commons

Joel Getzendanner is introducing Identity Commons. Identity Commons (IC) is not a service provider, a technological alternative, or an umbrella organization. IC is a place for those working on identity. IC is technologically neutral. IC is intended to be a community of shared intent. IC is participant owned, egalitarian, and tries to keep control and content as local and distributed as possible. IC wants minimal authority over participants. The Identity Commons Web site seems to be mostly about i-names at this point, the primary thing they've been involved in thus far. That probably ought to be redone to more
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IIW2005: Paul Trevithick on Higgins Trust Framework

Identity is a three-body problem. When you use a credit card, there's pre-existing trust between the airline and the bank (brokered by Visa). You're the third party in that equation. Lots of groups that we belong to, lots of implementations. People want to manage relationships between extremely diverse contexts. This is where the Higgins Trust Framework (HTF) comes in. The goal of the HTF is to address four challenges: the lack of common interfaces to identity/networking systems, the need for interoperability, the need to manage multiple contexts, and the need to respond to regulatory, public or customer pressure to
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IIW 2005: Brad Fitzpatrick on OpenID

OpenID is similar to LID in that URLs are used for identifiers. Identity URLs can be static web pages so there's a low barrier to entry. Also, no SSL is required, nor is a browser plugin. OpenID is simply a way to prove you own a URL. OpenID can be stateful or stateless. Stateful access is faster, but requires more infrastructure to support. When you grab a URL, the URL has a way of saying who the identity server is (in the <link/> tag). The identity server provides a way for the person claiming the URL to prove (i.e.
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IIW2005: Johannes Ernst on LID

Johannes starts off with a discussion of REST because that's critical to his design principles for LID. He describes it this way: "everything that matters on the Internet has a URL, can be bookmarked, can be found via Google, can be hyperlinked, can be tagged, and can be accessed with a browser." People got very argumentative here. REST discussions do that. Johannes' conclusion: people need URLs. Similar argument to Drummond and XRIs, but with a different conclusion. Johannes gives a use case based on Doc's Company Relationship Management scenario and me trying to find a hotel in Berkeley. This
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IIW2005: Dick Hardt on Identity 2.0

Dick starts with a discussion of the SXIP 1.0 architecture. One of the things I note as I listen to Dick is the nomenclature problem. We have some people calling users "users" and others calling them "principals", some calling the relying party the "membersite", identity providers can be "homesites," and so on. This is hard to keep straight. You need a score card to keep up. I'm not picking on Dick here--he's picked his words and they're as good as anyone else's. The Identity Gang wiki has an identity lexicon that is attempting to "create a minimal set of
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IIW2005: Drummond Reed on XRIs

XRI is a syntax and resolution protocol for abstract identifiers---identifiers that are independent of the underlying network location, domain, application, or storage. It's an abstraction layer for identifiers of all types. You can use an XRI anyplace you can use a URI. An XRI can be downcast into a URI. There is also a standard way of making an XRI clickable called XRI Resolution. XRI is the product of an OASIS technical committee. In the same way that URI's unify the filename, IP address, and domain name layers into a single namespace, XRIs integrate URIs with names in the
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IIW2005: Brett McDowell on Liberty Alliance

Brett McDowall is speaking on Liberty Alliance to "engage the bottom-up community." The vision of Liberty Alliance (LA) is a networked world in which individuals and businesses can share identity information in a protected way. LA is working on technology standards and guidelines, business and privacy guidelines, and an ecosystem of interoperable products and services. The board and sponsors of LA are most of the big companies you'd recognize. But 50% of the membership is either non-profit or a company with less than 100 employees. Liberty ID-WSF 2.0 is based on SAML 2.0, WS-Security, and WS-Addressing. An earlier version
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IIW2005: Mike Jones on Identity Metasystems

We're trying to get to a world where there is a ubiquitous, user-centric identity solution for the Internet. The result should be a safer, more trustworthy Internet. Mike is showing a user experience for InfoCards, Microsoft's proposed identity solution. First time I've seen it. The solution, of course, is very thick client oriented since InfoCards is built into the OS. The vision is nice because there's a common experience for using InfoCards across every Web site. A ubiquitous identity solution must accommodate mutually contradictory requirements based on context. For example, most of the time we don't want people to
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IIW2005: Marry Ruddy on Use Cases

Mary Ruddy is speaking on Use Cases for the Social Web. Our hope is that by discussing use cases, we can lay a foundation for later discussion and give everyone a common frame of reference. Mary makes the point that use cases are stories. Keeping the discussion about stories helps people from different technology backgrounds to relate. Use cases: SSO, social commerce (Doc's example or recommender's, reviewers, and affiliates), augmented social networks, Katrina networking (lost and found people), soccer registration, Internet banking authentication, health care, etc. Question: can we move beyond authentication? Mary makes an interesting point that we
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IIW2005: Doc Searls

Doc is leading out today giving a foundation for why identity matters. Markets are places where people meet to exchange things and make culture. Free markets are not "your choice of silo." Doc notes that the difference between "content" and "speech" is critical. Congress can't regulate speech, but they can regulate the movement of content (his example is the FCC broadcast restrictions on obscenity). The 'Net needs to be a place for free speech and where free enterprise happens. This is an example of an issue that is not about left or right, Democrat or Republican. It can be
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IIW2005 IRC Channel

If you're trying to follow along at home, there is an IRC channel at irc.freenode.net/#identity
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Business Ignitor in Utah County

Connect Magazine is hosting another Utah County installment of its Business Ingnitor Series today (Wednesday Oct. 26th) from 3:30 - 5 p.m. at the Lindon Los Hermanos. Josh Coates of Berkeley Data Systems will be the speaker. You can register at Connect. Students get in free, so if you're interested, head on over. (When registering, students should register with a school e-mail address and select the "pay at the door" billing option. No one with an e-mail account from a school will have to actually pay at the door.) I'm in Berkelely for the Internet Identity Workshop, so unfortunately,
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Identity and Presence

I put a piece about the difference between identity and presence information at Between the Lines. The difference is pinpointed by iTunes in its use of proxies for presence to enforce its DRM policies--badly, as it turns out.
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A Better Command Line Find

If you're coming to OS X from UNIX, like me, then you're probably comfortable with the command line and you probably know your way around the find command. I use it all the time for finding files. Since I upgraded to Tiger, I use Spotlight a lot more, but there are still times when I want to find things on the command line. Apple has thoughtfully provided a Spotlight enabled version of find called mdfind Using mdfind is easy: just type the command followed by whatever you'd enter in the Spotlight search box. You'll get back a list of
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Yet Another Decentralized Identity Interoperability System

There have been several proposals for Internet identity systems over the past 18 months or so, including Microsoft's InfoCard proposal, SXIP, and several URL-based systems including LID, OpenID, and Passel. Today Brad Fitzpatrick (of LiveJournal/Six Apart and inventor of OpenID), Johannes Ernst (of NetMesh and LID), and David Recordon announced a proposal to build an interoperability framework for LID and OpenID called YADIS (Yet Another Decentralized Identity Interoperability System). Here's part of what they said in the announcement: Working on this problem, we realized quickly that what we were really building was a bottom-up, light-weight interoperability framework for personal
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IIW2005 Blog Aggregator

I've set up an RSS aggregator for IIW2005 so that people not attending the conference will have a one-stop place to keep up with what attendees (and others) are saying about it in their blogs. If you're going to be blogging about IIW2005 and the presentations, please send me the URL of your RSS feed so that I can add it to the list. In addition, we'll be recording the sessions and podcasting them later.
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Blueprint for Action

I picked a copy of Thomas Barnett's new book, Blueprint for Action : A Future Worth Creating. I really enjoyed his last book, The Pentagon's New Map, so I'm anxious to dig into the new one. I'm going to interview Barnett for IT Conversations in a few weeks. If you've got anything you'd like me to ask him, let me know.
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Speedpitch Lunch

If you're a Utah entrepreneur, or are willing to fly, Paul Allen and FundingUtah.com are hosting a speedpitching lunch on Nov 8. Here's how it works: Ten of Utah's top entrepreneurs will give five-minute pitches to several groups of 3-5 accredited angel investors rotating in a fast-paced, musical chairs style. After the end of the event, entrepreneurs will be available for question and answer sessions on an individual basis. SpeedPitching will enable promising entrepreneurs to present their ideas to a large number of angel investors in an intimate setting. In addition, angel investors will learn about Utah's most promising
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October's CTO Breakfast

Next Friday at 8am we'll get together for October's CTO Breakfast. I'll just be getting back from two days at the Internet Identity Workshop, so I'm sure I'll be fired up about that. I've also had several people lately ask about building quality assurance organizations and their role in software development, so I thought that would be a good thing to discuss with the group. I'd love to know what people are doing now and think they ought to be doing. Of course, any technology-related topics you're interested in are welcome as well. As usual, we'll be holding the
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Wanted: MITS Altair 8800

I'm looking to buy a MITS Altair 8800 computer if you know anyone who's got one. I'm mostly interested for sentimental reasons. I built one in 1976 and would love to have one. The price, of course, would depend on condition and acccessories. I want something that works. My fingers ache to toggle in 8080 machine code on the front panel switches and see the blinking lights.
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Tracking Your Printer

The EFF has been working to crack the code that some color printers put on every printed page. It's been long known that printer manufacturers put these codes in many color printers at the behest of the Secret Service, who's concerned about the potential for counterfeiting. The EFF, however, has revealed just how these codes work (with images). The images really bring this home. Just think about every document you print containing tracking codes that link it back to the printer in your office or home. The privacy concerns are huge. Imagine that you print a handbill complaining about
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Surfing Your Tivo

I'm probably just hopelessly behind, but in case you are too, I thought I'd post this. If your TiVo is networked (i.e. connected to your home LAN), but can surf the now playing list with a browser and download the shows. Just point your browser at https://your-tivo-ip-number/ The https is important. Otherwise, you end up looking at a do nothing splash page. You'll be asked to authenticate (HTTP authentication). Use tivo as the user name and your media access key (MAK) as the password. You can get the MAK from your Tivo under Setup. Once you download the program,
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IIW2005 Hotel Redux

OK, I chickened out. After I posted that I was staying at the Hotel Shattuck, David Kearns posted a note indicating it
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Cogito Is Hiring

Cogito, a Utah-based company that makes a very unique graph-based data storage and analysis system, is hiring. Here's what they're looking for: UI Developer - C#, .NET experience, enough development experience so as to not require much hand-holding. Lots of hustle prolific. Must want to be a heads-down developer, not a leadership position. Data Broker Architect - Significant enterprise application development experience with emphasis on back-end DB, integration and meta-data experience. Java enterprise experience. Familiarity with the major enterprise applications and databases. This position will require large scale design and small team leadership abilities. Data Broker Developer -
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IIW2005 Hotel

I just made reservations at the Hotel Shattuck for IIW2005 based on nothing more than gut feel. Let me know if I've made a huge mistake. If you're looking for a hotel for IIW2005, there's a list on the wiki. There's a little more than 60 people currently signed up. If you're planning on coming and haven't registered yet, it would help us a lot if you could do so soon so that we can order food. Also, if you'd like a t-shirt, you have to order it yourself.
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Robb and Barnett

If you've followed Tom Barnett, as I have, and know John Robb (former COO of Userland) then this interchange between the two will interest you. John wrote a piece for the NYTimes called "The Open Source War." Tom offered a critique. Nice to see it all come to my feedreader.
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Means, Motive, and Opportunity

I just finished a post at Between the Lines on the importance of the Massachusetts vs. Microsoft battle over whether Office is included in the Massachusetts enterprise architecture. Bottom line: government CIOs have had the means and motive to make such a move. Massachusetts' actions have given them the opportunity to make the same move. On the same subject, David Berlind's comprehensive report on the process Massachusetts followed in the ETRM process should be a must read for any government CIO or IT manager.
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IIW2005 Shirts Are OK

I ordered a couple of IIW2005 shirts from Cafepress to make sure they looked OK. I ordered the long-sleeved T and the Ash Gray T. Both looked good. The logo looks great--no jaggies or anything and the T-shirt quality is good. I'm happy with them.
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Trading Performance for Better Design

Phil Windley and Rick Adam at the Business Ignitor talk. It's a timeworn tale in the world of computers: a new technological advance relaxes some design constraints and some of the increased headroom is used by the designers to add modularity of the design with abstract interfaces. Only this time, the story isn't about computers--it's about airplanes. Yesterday I flew my plane up to Ogden to moderate a discussion with Rick Adams, CEO of Adam Aircraft. If you're not a pilot, you probably haven't heard of Adam Air, but it's one of the hot new companies in aviation. I
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Thin is In

IFlyAKite Desktop in Javascript I'm not sure what the purpose of this site is, but it's cool. If the purpose is to show just how far Javascript can be pushed to create a rich-client feel inside a browser, then I'd say they've succeeded. Apple will probably try to shut this down, but they ought to leave it up as a monument to dedication.
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Ways of Thinking, Ways of Doing

In a recent column, Jon Udell says "much of what seems to be modern innovation is, in fact, rediscovery of ... Lisp and Smalltalk." He goes on later to say: If existing tools can do more than we realize, we could spare ourselves a bit of grief. But probably not a lot. Translating ways of thinking into ways of doing always takes longer than we predict. From The spiral staircase of SOA | InfoWorld | Column | 2005-09-28 | By Jon UdellReferenced Wed Oct 12 2005 09:55:00 GMT-0600 (MDT) This is an interesting point and one that's under-appreciated, particularly
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Why Bloggers Blog

A study by public relations firm Edelman shows that the number one reason bloggers blog is to "establish themselves as a visable authority in their field." Number two was to "create a record of my thoughts." Of course, for many of us, there's more than one reason. The body of the survey was aimed at understanding the potential for PR firms to use bloggers to get their word out.
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Google News Reader

Yesterday Google announced their news reader. I played with it a little and wrote a review over at Between the Lines. My bottom line: I like it and I'm going to keep using it.
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Business Ignitor

Thursday Rick Adams, CEO of Adam Air will be speaking at this months edition of the Business Ignitor series. Rick's talk will be at the Ogden Airport at 3:30. Adam Aricraft recently announced that they're going to locate their manufacturing facility for their new line of planes in Ogden. Makes sense: Ogden's got a nice big airport and there's plenty of skilled aircraft workers from Hill AFB. Rick will speak for 15 minutes or so and then I'll moderate questions from the audience. I'm planning on flying up from Provo--I don't need much of an excuse to fly. Sorry,
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Reverse the Question

In response to my questions about the word 'identity,' P. T. Ong says: You don't get definitions right, it's hard to have lucid thoughts, let alone unambiguous communications. "Do identical twins have different identities even if we can't tell them apart?" Define what you mean by "identity" and I'll answer your question. We can't even answer basic questions about the "things" we are talking about because we don't have common definitions of them. Convinced yet about the importance of a well defined ontology for the digital identity community? From Random Thoughts on Digital Identity: If a Tree Falls ...Referenced
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Perimeter Defenses

Peter Coffee wrote an article referencing my book, Digital Identity. It's hard to admit that you've been doing things wrong, especially when you've gotten really good at it. When a company--or even an entire industry--gets built on the foundation of a fatally flawed idea, something really big and obvious may need to happen before people are willing to move together toward a different approach. I found an excellent example of this behavior in Phillip Windley's newly published book, "Digital Identity," from O'Reilly Media. Most good computer security metaphors have been overused to the point of dreary familiarity, but Windley
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Greasemonkey and Microformats

Mark Pilgrim's been busy creating GreaseMonkey scripts that read and understand microformats. His goal is an uberscript that can be used to pull microformat structure from Web pages. Mark says: [I]magine searching such a database. And subscribing to your search results as a syndicated feed. It's coming. Within weeks, not years. All the data is out there; people are publishing this stuff anyway. If they publish it just 1% better (with appropriate microformatting), I can get 1000% more out of it. Or do you just use your browser to browse? That's so 20th century. From [microformats-discuss] Re: Educationg OthersReferenced
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Roadblocks to Ubiquity

In a post about Dick Hardt's Identity 20 talk, Jon Udell makes an important statement: Even a tech-savvy person like me has a hard time envisioning, never mind comparing, the interaction scenarios proposed by various identity schemes including Sxip, Microsoft's InfoCard, Shibboleth, and federated PKI. From Jon Udell: Envisioning identityReferenced Mon Oct 10 2005 10:24:02 GMT-0600 (MDT) Johannes Ernst picks up on that and adds: I completely agree, and would add that nobody, not even the "insiders" really understand what consequences all the different proposed architectures have in terms of, say, who gets empowered and whose power diminishes how
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Internet Identity Workshop Shirts

I've created a Cafepress store with the Internet Identity Workshop logo so that you can buy IIW2005 gear. Enjoy.
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Craig Burton Cries 'Ubiquity'

Craig Burton and Kim Cameron have a couple of posts on Identity 2.0 and what's required to make it happen. I wrote about it at Between the Lines. Good stuff. Exactly the kind of discussion I hope we can have at the Internet Identity Workshop at the end of the month.
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Powerbook Surgery: Upgrading the Hard Drive

It seems like I'm always running out of space on my hard drive. All those digital photos and trips to the iTunes Music store, I guess. At any rate, when I got a new 17 inch Powerbook a few weeks ago, I wanted more than the 100Gb that is offered by Apple. So, I downgraded it to 80Gb to save a little money and ordered a 120Gb drive (5400 RPM, Seagate). When the new PB arrived, I didn't even turn it on--just cracked the case and put in the new drive. There's a great site, called PBFixIt that has
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IdM Challenge

InfoWorld put six identity management products through the wringer in an environment designed to test them in real-world scenarios. Here's the conclusion: Every so often, when we're lucky, widespread necessity and solution maturity collide head-on. This is exactly what's happening today in the sphere of identity management. Although the underlying concepts of identity management aren't new, it's becoming clear that the execution of these concepts by solutions vendors is ready for the mainstream. Between mandates from on high, such as Sarbanes-Oxley, and needs from below, such as the need to address management headaches associated with the constant march of
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Centralized and P2P Services

Over at Freedom to Tinker, Ed Felton points out that most interesting systems on the Web are built from distributed computers. That's not what makes an architecture P2P. He says: "[T]he issue isn't whether the services uses lots of distributed computers. The issue is who controls those computers."
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On the Word 'Identity'

On the way back from a meeting in Salt Lake this afternoon, I was pondering the word 'identity' and the way it is used in the physical world and the way we use it in the world of IT. Something I heard on NPR set off this navel gazing--I can't remember what. Coincidentally, when I got to my office, I found this post from Tim Greyson on the living language of identity. And so, a post... If I ask my wife, kids, or neighbors "what is identity?" they answer in various ways that I think reduce, at their most
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Gadget Board

Jason Holt's put together a gadget board, a prototyping board based on the Atmel microcontroller (see photo). His design has a built-in monitor program for controlling the board. The I/O features eight analog inputs, seven 0-5v inputs and one input with adjustable max voltage, eight high current MOSFET outputs, and 4 high current relays. Jason's offering the schematics, code, and instructions for free or will also sell you a completed board.
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O'Reilly on Web 2.0

Tim's framing up the Web 2.0 idea and does a great job of explaining why it's different and why it matters. This quote, I think is pivotal: At bottom, Google requires a competency that Netscape never needed: database management. Google isn't just a collection of software tools, it's a specialized database. Without the data, the tools are useless; without the software, the data is unmanageable. Software licensing and control over APIs--the lever of power in the previous era--is irrelevant because the software never need be distributed but only performed, and also because without the ability to collect and manage
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Blogging Talk Encore

I'm giving an encore presentation of my talk on why blogging matters in TNRB 280 today at 3:30pm.
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Government OSCON

GOSCON, the Government Open Source Convention, will be held in Portland on Oct 13 and 14, 2005.
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SOA Governance: What We Can Learn from Cities

I've made the analogy between digital identity management architectures and city planning. A recent article in the Architecture Journal (from Microsoft) takes this analogy to it's conclusion with a well written piece that outlines the parallels and shows how what we know about city planning can inform our questions about SOA governance. The article cites these parallels between the two domains that indicate that ideas from one can be profitably translated into the other: The distribution of design The constancy of change The need for progressive improvement The recursive nature of the architecture The article references and builds on
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Virtual Rights Online Symposium

Jaco Aizenman and John Clippinger are chairing an online symposium on virtual rights. Simple put, "[v]irtual Rights is the right to choose to have a Virtual Identity, and the right to choose not to have a Virtual Identity." More broadly, I think it refers to the rights people have surrounding their virtual identities as well. The effort has gained considerable ground in Costa Rica. The online symposium will take place between Sep 30, 2005 and Mar 31, 2006 on a mailing list maintained by Jaco. Let him know if you're interested in participating. I think this might be a
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Persistence Configuration in EJB 3.0

In EJB 3.0, persistence is done using plain old java objects (POJOs). As far as I know, JBoss is the only J2EE capable application server supporting EJB 3.0 at this point. In the JBoss implementation the Hibernate roots of persistent POJOs are still very much visable. That's good news since that means that much of the Hibernate documentation can be used to understand EJB 3.0. In JBoss, the default persitence properties are stored in $JBOSS_HOME/server/all/deploy/ejb3.deployer/META-INF/persistence.properties The meaning of most of the configuration parameters you see there can be found in the Hibernate configuration documentation. By default, the persistence configuration
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IIW2005 Program

The program for Day One (Oct 26th) of the Internet Identity Workshop has been published. I'm very excited about it. I think it's a great line-up and will give us a chance to see many of the major systems and ideas around Internet Identity side-by side. The schedule for Day Two is open, being run as structured open space. As such, we're collecting topics and presentations for Day Two, but we'll decide on the schedule as the first order of business on that day. As you can see, we also have a Bryant Cutler-designed logo. Feel free to use
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